Time To Let The Police Fight Back?

No stranger to controversy, Adam Shaw asks why we don’t let the Police fight back against protesters.

march1 Time To Let The Police Fight Back?

It is difficult to know where to start with Saturday’s “March for the Alternative.”  Do I comment on how, despite the name, no alternative except for “spend more, tax more and deny the deficit at all costs” was put forward?  Do I challenge the protesters’ claim to represent the majority of Britons, when considering the turnout was around 400,000 they cannot even claim to represent the majority of public sector union members (approximately 4 million) even if one ignores the fact that the majority of the crowd were students and rent-a-mob?

My initial thought was to point out that the Suffragettes, the American Civil Rights movement and the South African anti-apartheid movement that Ed Miliband unironically tried to compare the protest to, were all fighting for freedom from state tyranny, not trying to impose such tyranny on others as the radical marchers wish to do.

Yet as I thought of the above, all made me chuckle and shake my head.  The thing that made me really angry about the whole march was the left’s treatment and disregard of the police, and I do not just mean the violent minority.
As much as the left in both Britain and America try and stoke up fear about the rise of the “violent right”, such groups have absolutely nothing on the organisation, aggression, and sheer violence of the violent left.  Every time there is a G8 protest, a tuition fees protest, or an anti-cuts protest, you can guarantee that London is getting smashed up, and police officers will be injured.

 

Police attack 300x187 Time To Let The Police Fight Back?We knew this for weeks, and yet organisers and marchers seemed not to care either before or after.  The organisers were too busy worrying about whether the police response would be a bit too rough for their liking, and the so-called non-violent protesters on the day were cheering the violent ones on, not calling for them to stop.  The most telling of pictures is the one that accompanies this article – one violent protester attacking a police officer, while three grinning lefties film the officer with glee in the hope that he retaliates so that they can send their images off to the BBC as evidence of “police brutality.”

After the march, there have been the typically vague statements of “regret” by organisers of the violence, yet such statements seek only to assure us that they were “a minority” instead of showing genuine remorse for the violence, destruction of private and public property, and injured Bobbies that they left in their wake.

Since then we have had articles in the Guardian informing us that actually the violence is all exaggerated by the media.  The Guardian’s Michael White informs us about how wonderful and “carnival-like” the march was, describing the trespassing UK Uncut (who broke into private stores and defaced and smashed them up) as “wholesome”, and condemning TV for covering the hooligans and not the “real” story.

Well, the real story was that 31 police officers were injured, 11 of which were taken to hospital.  Protesters used smoke bombs, petrol bombs, and light bulbs filled with ammonia – all three of which can kill a police officer.  But instead, the left are more concerned that the camera didn’t pick up on their “witty” signs.

We have seen no videos of police getting injured, we know of none of the names of the officers, nor have there been any interviews with the officers in question to see if they are okay.  We do not even know what the injuries are that they received.  Yet all the “non-violent” protesters were lurking with their phones and cameras, waiting for that moment of police “brutality” that they can run off with to the BBC, howling like a child with a bruised knee at the injustice of it all.

Whenever a protester is injured, we are told about it at length and in detail, along with interviews with the “victim” about how scarred and traumatised they are by the whole thing.  We are lectured constantly about the sheer, unadulterated horror of kettling – the “controversial” (so says the Guardian) tactic by which our poor, persecuted student revolutionaries have to suffer the indignity of standing around for a bit.  Yet, cave a police officer’s head in with a piece of wood, and no-one seems to care -just as long as no-one hurts one of our precious Che wannabes.

What is so abhorrent about this whole process is that 31 officers didn’t need to be injured on Saturday.  Yet, the Met have bowed to the pressure of the professional left who howl about how shocked and appalled they are whenever an officer dares to swing a baton in the direction of a protester.  It has resulted in a softly softly approach that only served to put police officers in danger of serious injury or worse.

It is time to stop kowtowing to the professional left and to start protecting our officers by allowing them to fight back against these cowards posing as revolutionaries.  If these latte drinking Bolsheviks want a fight, then fine.  They can bring their ammonia filled light bulbs, and our boys in blue will bring tear gas and a good baton swing – let’s see who goes home crying to Mummy.

10 comments
Billy C
Billy C

I would certainly agree that the police should protect themselves where necessary and defend property from damage. However, I think one should be weary of how far one pushes that envelope; a lot of provocateurs of violence at these marches, I suspect, are off duty security workers and sometimes police, as has been proved to have occurred in recent demonstrations in north america. The only outcome I can see such people have in mind is for an outraged public to throw power at the police for them to do 'whatever it takes' to prevent the violence, which could have catastrophic results, not just for the guilty. Remember Tomlinson? As I say, they should certainly be able to perform the role as enforcers of the law by whatever means, but we should not look to the police to 'punish' individuals in the street who break the law. A good read overall, and I certainly don't think anyone at the demonstrations would call themselves conservative, and if they did, they shouldn't!

Tyler
Tyler

The answer is simple.. For the same reason we don't allow protestors to fight back against the police. Police AND those not on the force sometimes make the mistake of lashing out, and that is illegal. Cops must follow the law too, and sometimes, they break it.. We're all human.

Mohsin
Mohsin

I agree. That defence should involve batons, dogs, water cannons, mounted cavalry officers, and perhaps tasers. Even rubber bullets and various not lethal toxins should be unleashed on the great unwashed horde who belittle the great capital.

Adam Shaw
Adam Shaw

Conor, I think even if we accept that it does happen from time to time, it is ridiculously rare. In my time as a conservative I have never come across a conservative who is "hardline" but disagrees with conservative economics, just as I have never encountered a socialist who thinks redistribution of wealth is hokum, or a UKIP member who wants a federal European Superstate! :-) Any "conservative" who went to a TUC organised rally against the government's main policy (and one that is mainly criticised by conservatives for not being tough enough) really needs to consider why they belong to the party! As I said, even if there were hundreds of conservatives like that at the march (which I really doubt) we are still talking less than .01%, and therefore its still an almost entirely left-wing march. The student protest may have had a few more as it wasn't a central Tory policy, but again, we're still talking left, left, left predominantly! They didn't attack Tory HQ because they are all angry conservatives! Mohsin, I'm not calling for "beats" for the sake of it ;-) Instead, I'm just calling for the police to have the ability to defend themselves, and private property, from those who wish to attack police and destroy private property!

Conor
Conor

I'm not just referring to the march against cuts but the student protests as well. The fact is you can be a conservative and disagree with conservativ economics. In fact one of the people I knew who was at the march worked for a conservative MP in their constituency office for two years up until the last general election and is very much a hard lined conservative who happens to disagree with Osborne and the coalition. It does happen. And Mohsin, you seemed confused as to what a hippy is. Very confused.

Mohsin
Mohsin

Adam, would you support the police in beating these liberal hippies down?

Adam Shaw
Adam Shaw

Sorry Conor, but I find it extremely hard to believe that there was a notable conservative contingent at the march! I can't see many small government conservatives, who voted for Tories - a party whose central plank was spending cuts - going on a march against what will amount to 3% cuts over the next 3 or 4 years. If they do, they need to really reassess why they call themselves conservatives! Even if we go for benefit of the doubt, and say there were a handful of "conservatives" there, we are still talking about a 99.9% left-wing march!

Mohsin
Mohsin

Anyone who causes social disorder deserves a good thrashing to be honest. And tell them to dress properly, none of that 'new age' design thanks. The police should play Rebecca Black's Friday thru loud speakers at them.

Conor
Conor

You've both made the mistake of assuming it was only the left involved, I knew a number of people who marched in protests who are very firm conservatives. To suggest that every single person who took part in any of the recent protests in this country is a leftie is crazy

Mohsin
Mohsin

I look forward to seeing police beat hippies. The loony left annoy me no end.

Trackbacks

  1. […] from the coverage of the event that for every small gang of violent thugs, there was a much larger crowd of leftists behind them cheering them on. This is nothing new; anti-capitalist marches during G8 […]

  2. […] from the coverage of the event that for every small gang of violent thugs, there was a much larger crowd of leftists behind them cheering them on. This is nothing new; anti-capitalist marches during G8 […]